DIY Tiered Tassel Earrings

DIY Tiered Tassel Earrings

Just as my wardrobe has become more minimal, my earrings have become… well, maximal! I have clear memories of feeling quite glamorous as a kiddo with pierced ears wearing my mother’s oversized earrings leftover from the ’80s. But then there was a span of about twenty years when, as my fashion sense developed, earrings felt a little too gaudy. Well, that is with the exception of my minimal silver hoop earring phase at the turn of the century. (They went well with my flared jeans and Abercrombie tees!)

Lately I’ve found myself surprised by my interest in the oversized earrings I’ve seen dangling on the ears of fashionable ladies all over the web. I decided I was ready for the earring revival, and I was going to jump in with both feet– and with a DIY take on the statement earring trend.

DIY Tiered Tassel Earrings

DIY Tiered Tassel Earrings

statement earring DIY

DIY Tiered Tassel Earrings

statement earring DIY

Step One: Remove the paper from one embroidery floss bundle and fold it in half. Use an approximately 12″ strand from the extra embroidery floss bundle to tie it tightly in the middle and the knot it.

Step Two: Cut through the loops at either end of the bundled floss.

DIY Tiered Tassel Earrings

Step Three: Pull the either end of the tied bundled downward and secure tightly as shown above with a strand from the extra embroidery floss bundle. I tied it once on one side, flipped it over and tied it again, then flipped it over and tied in a knot. 

DIY Tiered Tassel Earrings

Step Four: Use a darning needle to thread the two ends of the floss you just tied into the tassel and out the bottom.

Step Five: Give your tassel a haircut to make it even on the bottom and the size that you desire. You will need very sharp fabric scissors to do this well.

DIY Tiered Tassel Earrings

Repeat steps 1-5 until you have created 6 tassels as shown above.

DIY Tiered Tassel Earrings

Step Six: Arrange your tassels in two rows of three, making sure each row’s tassels are evenly sized compared to the row of tassels beside it. Use a darning needle to hide the top knot strands of the top two tassels in each row, trimming them to be the same length as the tassel. Leave only one strand untucked on the bottom tassel of each row, but tuck the other one in.

Step Seven: Use the remaining strand from the bottom tassel to connect the entire row of tassels. To do this, thread the strand through a darning needle and use the needle to guide the thread through the bottom of each tassel and up through the middle of the tassel’s top.

DIY Tiered Tassel Earrings

Step Eight: Knot the thread tightly around the eye of the ear wires, making sure to get the ear wire tight up against the top of the tassel. Then use the darning needle to hide the remaining strand of embroidery floss down into the tassels. Trim it to blend in nicely.

DIY Tiered Tassel Earrings

I was so excited about these earrings that I made two pairs right away– one in black yarn, then these in ecru embroidery floss. I wore them to church over the weekend (paired with a simple black shift dress and nude clogs) and had a lot of fun conversations about them, as you can imagine! I guess that’s why they’re called statement earrings– they practically require a reaction!

What do you think? Are you ready for the return of statement earrings, or are you happy to leave the trend in the annals of the ’80s?

Lucy’s Madeline Costume

Madeline Halloween Costume

Lucy’s costume this year has been a dream come true for me! I had thought about dressing up as Madeline myself a few years ago, but never had the gumption to put together an outfit in time for Halloween. But this year, I was so delighted when I asked Lucy, “What about being Madeline for Halloween this year?” and she replied with an excited, “That would be so fun!” I had caught her at the perfect time, in the middle of an old Madeline TV episode we were watching through our Amazon fire stick. She has been intrigued by Madeline and the girls at the old house in Paris, particularly when Madeline has to go to the hospital to get her appendix removed. What can I say, my girl loves hospital drama. I’m sure she’ll love Grey’s Anatomy one day as much as she loves Madeline now.

Madeline book

Lucy decided she wanted to wear a wig to have red hair like Madeline, and I found a dress pattern online with a Peter Pan collar just like Madeline’s. Trick-or-treating is this weekend, and I have until then to make an insulated capelet to keep her warm on a chilly fall evening as we walk from door to door. But I couldn’t wait to share her outfit with you, sans capelet. Check out where I found everything below!

Madeline Costume Buy Online

O U T F I T   D E T A I L S :

  • H A T :  The one Lucy’s wearing is a vintage find from several years ago that I fixed up with a new black grosgrain ribbon, but I also found a very similar yellow hat here.
  • D R E S S :  I made the dress using this Simplicity Toddler Peter Pan collar dress and coat pattern, slightly reworking to it put the collar on the dress.
  • K N E E   S O C K S :  Lucy wore tights because it was chilly, but we love these white toddler knee socks, and they’re more authentic to Madeline’s outfits in the book.
  • S H O E S :  Any simple black mary janes would fit the bill. We found Lucy’s at a local secondhand store, but here is a great pair of toddler black patent mary janes for less than $20.
  • W I G : I found this orange bob with bangs wig designed for an anime cosplay character, and while it was the perfect color and starting point for a Madeline ‘do, I had to trim the length and bangs and style it with a warm curling iron. Phil stepped up to model the wig while I trimmed it! What a man!

Madeline Dress Pattern

I was so intimidated to make the dress, though I don’t know why, because once I figured out the pattern, it was so quick and easy to put together! I decided I’m going to make a couple more variations on this pattern since the pattern pieces are already cut out, and it was such a simple project resulting in a super cute and versatile dress.

I have a bad habit of being intimidated of sewing projects, putting them off for as long as possible, sometimes abandoning projects altogether. It’s a silly habit I’m trying to break. This was a great simple project that gave me much more confidence as a seamstress. And look at that sweet face! SO WORTH IT.

Madeline Toddler Costume

Madeline Halloween Costume

Madeline hat and wig

Madeline Halloween Costume

Madeline hat and wig
Madeline Toddler Costume

A fun little side note… I took pictures of Lucy as Madeline at the venue where Phil and I had our wedding reception nine years ago! This is a spot we posed for wedding photos. Talk about coming full circle!

In case you were wondering, Juniper is dressing as a puppy (in a store-bought costume) for trick-or-treating, because Lucy’s favorite Madeline TV episode was when Madeline lost her dog. We’re pretty confident we won’t be losing Juniper, though, so don’t worry. The two of them looked so cute together at a friend’s costume party last weekend! We forgot to bring Juniper’s costume when we took Lucy’s pictures, so if you want to see them together, you’ll have to stay tuned for trick-or-treat shots on Instagram next weekend. :)

DIY Chokers — Three Ways

Leather Bow Choker DIY

Well, it’s official. Chokers have made the leap from trendy teenster fad to full-blown fashion trend! Fresh off the heels of the dainty neckscarf trend of 2015, 2016 brings with it a nice mix of fresh and tired choker styles.

Now this isn’t my first time on the choker bandwagon. I distinctly remember crafting my very own black velvet ribbon choker with a little drop pearl right when I was in the third grade. And then in middle school I was all about the stretchy black tattoo choker that I think I got from Fashion Bug. (Fashion Bug!) But this time around I’m more drawn to the early ’70s chokers that feel more delicate with a slight sense of boho. 

DIY Chokers

I had distinct ideas about what kinds of chokers I would like to add to my necklace collection, but I had a bit of trouble finding the perfect ones in stores. But I mean, if you’re going to DIY anything in your wardrobe— this would be it! They’re easy, fun, and completely wearable. These chokers vary slightly in skill more more complex to absurdly simple, but all of them are pretty quick to whip together and look great with lots of different sartorial styles.

DIY Fabric Flower Chokerromantic flower choker DIY

I love the Carrie Bradshaw vibes of this choker. It would fit in with a salsa dancing costume as easily as it would with a button up shirt and jeans. It can also be as bold or as subtle as you wish— just change up the ribbon width, size of flower, and color scheme to suit your own taste.

DIY Fabric Flower Choker

Supplies:

  • crepe or silk fabric
  • ribbon
  • ribbon end crimps (in width to match your ribbon)
  • two o-rings
  • one clasp
  • short chain
  • fabric scissors
  • pliers
  • lighter or candle flame
  • Not shown: embroidery floss and darning needle

DIY Fabric Flower Choker

Step One: Cut your ribbon to the length you need (a bit shorter than your neck circumference), then add the ribbon crimps to either end and close the crimps with pliers. Add an o-ring and clasp to one end and then an o-ring and the short chain to the other end.

DIY Fabric Flower Choker

Step Two: Cut your fabric into shapes as shown above in a variety of sizes.

DIY Fabric Flower Choker

Step Three: Hold the fabric shapes over a flame until the ends begin to curl up. Do not touch the flame to the fabric— just the heat will do the trick. After you’ve gone around the edges, it will have a petal look to it.

Step Four: Stack the petals you made from largest to smallest and stitch them to the ribbon with embroidery floss. As you stitch, make french knots on the top of the flower. You may also chose to create a fancier necklace by using a bead or some sort of bling for this detail.

DIY Fabric Flower Choker

DIY Bolo Style Choker DIY Bolo Style Choker

This style of choker makes me feel way more rockstar than I ever will be. It’s great with lower cut tops, but also looks cute draping over the front of a high-cut shirt. You can adjust the length of it to your own taste and add charms to the end that fit your personal style.

DIY Bolo Style Choker

Supplies:

  • cord
  • two charms
  • three crimp covers
  • two o-rings
  • one clasp
  • two crimps with rings attached
  • fabric scissors
  • pliers

DIY Bolo Style Choker

Step One: Cut a length of cord to be about 25-30″ in length then add charms to either end. Do this by looping the cord up through the charm’s o-ring then fastening the cord with crimp covers. Then trim away the excess cord.DIY Bolo Style Choker

Step Two: Hold the cord around your neck and determine about where you’d like the bolo fastener to be placed. Then use a crimp cover to fasten it. After fastening it, cut open the back so you can next add a clasp and chain.

DIY Bolo Style Choker

Step Three: After double checking that the neck circumference of the choker is appropriate for you (it should be a bit smaller than your actual neck circumference), add crimps to the end of the cord. Then add an o-ring and clasp to one end and an o-ring and short chain to the other end.

DIY Bolo Style Choker

Leather Bow Choker DIYleather bow choker

This is my favorite of all the choker styles I’m sharing today, and the simplest to make! I love how delicate it feels, and how easy it is to switch up the style a bit by changing materials (ribbon, satin cord, leather cord, etc..) Adding crimp covers to the end makes it feel more polished, and offers another opportunity to add style details to this choker.

Leather Bow Choker DIY

Supplies:

  • cord (I used faux suede)
  • crimp covers or any details you’d like to add to the ends

Leather Bow Choker DIY

All you need to do to make this necklace is trim the cord to the length you’d like for your bow and use pliers to fasten end crimps to either end of the cord. Then tie it in a bow around your neck and you’ve made yourself a choker!

Leather Bow Choker DIY

If a choker can make the stretch from 1950s dresses and shell tops to 1970s jumpsuits, I think they’ve earned themselves a place amongst my wardrobe. I think these DIY versions will be right at home with my style, considering how much wear they’ve received already. Do you think you’ll give making one a try?

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