1970s Magazine Inspiration

1970s boho modern kitchen

The 1970s is experience a revival in the design world these days, and as someone who likes a little sophisticated kitsch (that’s a thing, right?), I couldn’t be happier! I recently picked up some old House & Garden magazines from around 1969-1972, and found myself pouring over the interiors featured inside. Sure, a lot of the ’70s needs to stay buried, deep, deep down never to be seen again. But some of it is just gold. Harvest gold, sure, but if you look past the nightmarish wall-to-wall carpeting and remember the magic of sunken living rooms and malm fireplaces, there’s treasure to be found.

I hope you enjoy a little decor inspiration for your Friday! I can’t stop thinking of oversized hex tiles, earthy color schemes, and funky textiles. I’m all about the mix— a bit boho, a little mid century, a touch traditional, and a dash of glam. That grasscloth clad room below right? With the tailored white furnishings, oriental rug juxtaposed with the lucite coffee table and malm fireplace? Heaven. Which one’s your favorite room?

1970s home decor

1970s home decor

1970s sunken living room

1970s open shelving kitchen

1970s pink carpet bedroom

MOST WANTED: Vintage Planters

sideboard vignette with plants and candle holder

It seems like everyone’s bringing a little more green in to their homes these days, and I’m not just talking about paint! Even brown thumbs are giving houseplants a go, and with good reason! They add such warmth and liveliness to a space, and for those who like a good challenge, the right plant will fill that void in your life. Ha! As if we need another living creature to take care of, eh? Well, now that I’ve mastered the art of nurturing the houseplants I’ve had for years, I’ve been all about adding a few newbies into the mix, which in turn launched a hunt for a few new (old) pots. I really love the way vintage planters put the icing on top of my houseplant cake, adding a whole new element of texture and character to the decor of a room.

Now that I’ve claimed dibs on my favorites (they’re en route to my house as I type! Yippee!), I figured I ought to share the fruits of my vintage planter hunt with all of you, in case you’re in the market for a new houseplant or two. I mean, whose home couldn’t stand a new little green guy, amiright? Check these out, though! Very nice planters simply oozing all the cool mid century vibes.

(above planters on my dining room cabinet from left to right: West Elm; thrifted ; Lowes)

vintage plantersvintage planters

vintage planters Spiral Stoneware Planter (5″ x 6″) // $20.00
vintage planters White Splatter Pedestal Pot (6.5″ x 8″) // $26.00
vintage planters Turquoise Drip Glaze Dish (12″ x 4.5″) // $30.00
vintage planters Brown Spatter Pedestal Dish (5.75″ x 4″) // $10.00
vintage planters White Scalloped Bowl (6″ x 3″) // $19.95
vintage planters Two-Tone Brown Portuguese Planter (3.5″ x 4″) // $14.84
vintage planters Orange and Lavender Speckled Planter (5″ x 3.75″) // $18.00
vintage planters Brown Glazed Planter (5″ tall) // $14.00
vintage planters Copper Hanging Planter (2.5″ tall pot) // $48.00
vintage planters Green Splatter Dish (9.75″ x 3.5″) // $20.00
vintage planters Blue and Teal Footed Planter (5.5″ x 4.5″) // $60.00
vintage planters Black Stoneware Globe Vase (4.5″ x 3.5″) // (etsy shop on break)
vintage planters Goldenrod Yellow Pedestal Planter (5″ x 5″) // $10.98
vintage planters Large White Pumpkin-esque Planter (10.5″ x 5.75″) // $78.50

And for good measure, I thought I’d share some new plants I have in my home! Hanging pothos plants are my fail-safe houseplant that I can use in dimmer lit rooms. I’d been wanting to hang something in our bathroom for quite a while, and finally got these cool diagonally glazed planters from CB2. I think the pothos will grow pretty long and look beautiful in here!

CB2 hanging planters

I found this ficus tree (below) on Craigslist and took Lucy on a two-hour road trip (four hours there and back) to go get it. We’re crazy like that! (Super fun experience, by the way! We talked all the way there and back!) I was really nervous about having this ficus in our home, because I heard they are notorious for dropping leaves in shock when moved to a new location. I love the tree and while I would’ve been disappointed to lose the money (just $30) and waste the effort I put into the tree, I mostly just really felt like this tree is exactly what our living room has needed. So, I have lost some leaves, but I’ve also have a lot of regrowth and feel pretty good about this guy! It’s a great sculptural element to jazz up the simple white brick fireplace wall in our living room.

ficus alii

And last, but not least, I decided to challenge myself to grow a couple of cacti in our home (one pictured below). I’ve been convinced that they’re very easy to maintain, and I’ve been reading lots about them, but they’re so different from anything I’ve grown, I definitely feel challenged and a wee bit worried.

houseplant collection(above planters in order of left to right: West Elm, Vintage, Home Goods, Amazon, Ikea)

Side note: Am I the only one who stays awake at night worrying about my plants and reading up about them? I feel a a bit like a crazy person. Crazy plant lady. It’s the new cool thing to be. I’ll accept the title gladly.

INSPIRED BY: Late Fifties’ Homes

Late Fifties' Homes on Making Nice in the Midwest

As our 1959 ranch has begun to take shape in its second year as our home sweet home, I’ve been drawing loads of inspiration from vintage interiors from the same era. The color scheme, the restrained and smart furniture arrangements, and especially the sparse and avant-garde placement of wall art. Check out my most recent round-up of vintage home inspiration, and be sure to check out my INSPIRED BY: Vintage Homes archives!

Late Fifties' Homes on Making Nice in the Midwest

Everything about these interiors is pretty drool-worthy, if you ask me, but mostly I really love the modern furniture covered in fun colors and patterns. No safe, tan sofas in these homes! And check it out— a pink shag rug? And it somehow doesn’t look tacky. Those are the decorating chances I’d love to take if Phil would let me. It all works with tasteful style and restrained backgrounds. Someone get this women a pink shag rug, will ya? Or better yet— a pink passion pit right smack dab in the middle of my living room! Oh yeah.

Late Fifties' Homes on Making Nice in the MidwestLate Fifties' Homes on Making Nice in the Midwest

vintage magazine images found at these Pinterest links: 1 2 3 4 5 6

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